irony

Reserve irony for situations where there's a gap between reality and expectations, especially when such a gap is created for dramatic or humorous effect.

In Greek, eiron meant a dissembler — someone who hides their true intentions. Today, we do something very similar when we employ irony, often by saying the opposite of what we really mean. The word can also refer to a situation that turns out to be amusingly different from what we expected: "I thought he had stolen the Fig Newtons, but the irony was that he thought the same thing of me." Note that this is more than just an improbable coincidence!

PRIMARY MEANINGS OF: irony

1
n
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
2
n
witty language used to convey insults or scorn
FULL DEFINITIONS OF: irony
1

n incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs

“the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated”
Types:
Socratic irony
admission of your own ignorance and willingness to learn while exposing someone's inconsistencies by close questioning
Type of:
incongruity, incongruousness
the quality of disagreeing; being unsuitable and inappropriate

n a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs

Types:
dramatic irony
(theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
Type of:
figure, figure of speech, image, trope
language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
2

n witty language used to convey insults or scorn

irony is wasted on the stupid”
Synonyms:
caustic remark, sarcasm, satire
Type of:
humor, humour, wit, witticism, wittiness
a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
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