grammar

Grammar is the set of language rules that you use, most of the time unconsciously, to create phrases and sentences that convey meaning.

You may dread studying grammar, but in fact you already know much of the grammar of your native language. If you grew up speaking English, no one had to tell you that "Throw the ball to me," is a sentence in English, but "Ball the me to throw" is not. You may, though, need coaching to avoid common errors — “bad grammar" — like “Throw the ball to he and I,” where you should say “Throw the ball to him and me.”

DEFINITIONS OF: grammar

1

n the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)

Types:
show 8 types...
hide 8 types...
descriptive grammar
a grammar that is produced by descriptive linguistics
prescriptive grammar
a grammar that is produced by prescriptive linguistics
syntax
studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
morphology
studies of the rules for forming admissible words
generative grammar
(linguistics) a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description
accidence, inflectional morphology
the part of grammar that deals with the inflections of words
derivational morphology
the part of grammar that deals with the derivations of words
compound morphology
the part of grammar that deals with combinations of simple words into compound words
Type of:
descriptive linguistics
a description (at a given point in time) of a language with respect to its phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics without value judgments
WORD FAMILY
USAGE EXAMPLES