anaphora

When the same phrase is used at the beginning of a series of sentences, that's anaphora. It's used to show emphasis in speech or writing — a popular tool for politicians, religious leaders, lyricists, and poets.

In Martin Luther King Jr's most famous speech, he said "I have a dream" eight different times. He used anaphora as a rhetorical technique, repeating the words to drive home a point. As a literary device, anaphora also gives emphasis and rhythm to lines like these of Charles Dickens: "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times," with the repetition of "it was" eight more times in one sentence. In Greek, anaphora means "a carrying back."

DEFINITIONS OF: anaphora

1

n repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses

Synonyms:
epanaphora
Type of:
repetition
the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device

n using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier

Type of:
repetition
the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
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