Topic:Grammar

From the annual meeting of the American Copy Editors Society in Las Vegas comes some earth-shaking news: the folks who edit the Associated Press Stylebook have loosened the distinction between "over" and "more than." The stylebook editors announced that they are now fine with "over" being used with numbers. Many of those in attendance were aghast, while others hailed the change as long overdue. Continue reading...
TOPICS: Grammar, Media, Usage
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.
March 4th is National Grammar Day, so let's celebrate grammatically! As part of the festivities, the American Copy Editors Society has sponsored a grammar-themed haiku contest on Twitter. The entries have been submitted — enjoy them below. Continue reading...
TOPICS: Fun, Grammar, Poetry
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.

Blog Excerpts

Get Your Haiku On for National Grammar Day

National Grammar Day, celebrated every year on March 4th, is just around the corner. This year, the American Copy Editors Society is sponsoring a Tweeted Haiku Contest. Just tweet your grammar-related haiku using the #GrammarDay hashtag and you'll be entered in the competition! The deadline is noon EST, Monday, March 3rd. You can read more details here, and check out last year's winners here.
TOPICS: Fun, Grammar, Poetry
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.
Online dating sites love to use Valentine's Day as an opportunity to talk about how people size up their potential romantic interests. And it turns out that an attention to grammar, particularly usage of the word "whom," just might help out men who would like to attract members of the opposite sex. Continue reading...
TOPICS: Fun, Grammar, Usage
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.
Language writer Jen Doll takes on the phenomenon of linguistic "peeving" for the Atlantic and collects a list of "classics." See any you recognize? Continue reading...
TOPICS: Grammar, Language, Usage
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.
For 24 years, the American Dialect Society has chosen a Word of the Year at its annual meeting in January. Typically, the word has been a noun or verb that has risen to prominence during the previous year. But this year, strong candidates such as selfie and twerk ultimately lost to a word that isn't a noun, verb, or adjective; doesn't describe some cultural phenomenon; and has been in continuous use in English for more than 700 years: because. How did that happen? Continue reading...
TOPICS: Grammar, Language, Words
Click here to read more articles from Behind the Dictionary.
As a teacher of English as a foreign language, I've developed a bit of an aversion to adjectives. Show me too many and I break out into a prolonged, painful and unpleasant rash. Or should that be painful, prolonged and unpleasant? Or...? Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Teachers at Work.
1 2 3 4 5 Displaying 1-7 of 39 Articles