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Find out where the word "good" leads you in this tongue-in-cheek personality quiz flowchart from Vocabulary.com. Continue reading...
Rialto High School started the academic year off with a bang, sweeping the Vocabulary.com leaderboard with a back-to-school challenge from teacher Jennifer Johnston to her students: master 100 words every week. She joined them in the challenge, putting herself out as the rabbit to beat in the race. Continue reading...
Do you have a vocabulary fingerprint — are there words you use often enough that others recognize them as belonging to you? Think: the apparently kid. Slate's Good Word columnist Matthew J.X. Malady admits to iteration as a vocabulary fingerprint. Meanwhile, Twilight fans will note that Stephenie Meyer uses stare 181 times in the first book in the series alone. Continue reading...
Karen Joy Fowler's PEN/Faulkner Award-winning novel We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (now shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize as well) is narrated by a character with an outsize vocabulary. Here, Fowler speaks with Vocabulary.com about the process of finding the words to create that character and the fun of breaking the rule, "Never use a 100-dollar word when a one-dollar word will do." Continue reading...
On WNYC's Leonard Lopate Show, Vocabulary.com lexicographer Ben Zimmer transformed the shows usual conversation about culture into a call-in vocabulary quiz show. Continue reading...
It's summer reading season, a great time for vocabulary growth. One summer reading option, Carol Weston's Ava and Pip, a novel for young readers, takes engagement with words to a new level, introducing the concept of words as toys to be taken apart and shaken around before being put back together. Continue reading...
If Argentina had prevailed against Germany in yesterday's World Cup final, you couldn't really have called it an upset. Germany had dominated during the past weeks of World Cup play, but Argentina had gone in as a strong contender. It was a hard fought game decided by a single goal scored in extra time. Neither an upset nor its opposite. Which brings up an interesting vocabulary question: What would a word for the opposite of an upset be? Do we have one in English? Continue reading...
TOPICS: Word Origins
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