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HOW IT WORKS:

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    Answer a few questions

    We've created more than 120,000 questions designed to help you learn words.

  • 2

    We build a model of your knowledge

    Our magical technology models your brain. The more you play, the more we know about your vocabulary knowledge.

  • 3

    We predict which vocabulary words you don’t know and teach them to you

    Get a question wrong? We’ll schedule Review and Progress questions so that you’ll learn the word, and won’t forget it in the future.

  • 4

    You learn useful words and improve your vocabulary

    Track your progress as you quickly master the words that are essential to success in an academic or business environment.

Vocabulary Lists
FEATURED LISTS

Test Prep

100 SAT Words Beginning with "A"

What better way to prepare for the sentence completion and passage-based questions on the SAT than to commit yourself to completing our alphabetically organized SAT lists? Find lists of SAT words...
abase, aberration, abhor, abject, abrasive, abstain, abstract, more...
100 words

Literature

"Of Mice and Men," Vocabulary from Chapters 1-2

"The best laid schemes o' Mice an' Men, Gang aft agley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain, For promis'd joy!" Find out how these lines of the 18th century Scottish poet Robert Burns inspired the...
juncture, recumbent, restless, scowl, periscope, pantomime, contemplate, more...
25 words

Morphology & Roots

Food and Drink Words with Arabic Roots

Most words come to us from the English language's Germanic roots, as well as a lot of Latin and Ancient Greek. There are, however, many English words that are actually derived from Arabic. Most of...
albacore, alcohol, apricot, artichoke, aubergine, carafe, caraway, more...
18 words

Historical Documents

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

On 24th September 1996, the nations of the world convened to sign a treaty that banned the testing and development of all nuclear weapons in a massive step towards harmony and peace. This list of...
preamble, nuclear, proliferation, implementation, systematic, ultimate, cessation, more...
21 words

Speeches

Starting Your New Life: Inspiring Words from Commencement Speeches

Spring is in the air. So are graduation caps and words of wisdom. See how notable speakers from various fields (including a cartoonist, scientist, and president) have inspired the rising of new...
indispensable, untouchable, audacity, improvisation, inevitable, determine, indulge, more...
20 words

Just for Fun

Ain't too Proud to Beg!

The word "please" can only get you so far. Luckily, there is a very big lexicon of words that help us ask for favors. Ranging from blatant behavior fawning over the person who can aid us (obsequious)...
implore, beseech, entreat, adjure, prostrate, solicit, importune, more...
15 words

News

A Quick Current Events Quiz: Pulitzer Prizes in the News

Talking about the Pulitzer Prizes awarded this week? Make sure you're up on these ten words essential for talking about the forces shaping our culture. We publish this ten-word list drawn from news...
wry, lyric, compensate, rectify, deftly, subsequent, empathetic, more...
10 words
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Vocabulary.com Blog
Recently, science writer Annie Murphy wrote about "E-memory—electronic memory, the kind that's available on a computer" and "O-memory—organic memory, the old-fashioned sort that resides in the brain." Here's how that distinction can help us think about the way we learn words. Continue reading...

Blog Excerpts

Celebrating Labor (and Labour) Day

On the first Monday in September, the United States observes Labor Day, while Canadians celebrate Labour Day. If you want to know why labour is the accepted spelling in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries like Canada, while Americans prefer labor (and color, favor, honor, humor, and neighbor), check out this classic Word Routes column by Ben Zimmer.
Earlier this month, the Times Higher Education reported on the practice of "Roget-ing," in which plagiarism is disguised by swapping synonyms found in Roget's Thesaurus for words used in the copied paper. Though untraceable, the resulting language ranges from not quite right to cataclysmically horrible. Continue reading...
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